Availability::- use_module(library(error)).(can be autoloaded)
 type_error(+Type, +Term)
Tell the user that Term is not of the expected Type. This error is closely related to domain_error/2 because the notion of types is not really set in stone in Prolog. We introduce the difference using a simple example.

Suppose an argument must be a non-negative integer. If the actual argument is not an integer, this is a type_error. If it is a negative integer, it is a domain_error.

Typical borderline cases are predicates accepting a compound term, e.g., point(X,Y). One could argue that the basic type is a compound-term and any other compound term is a domain error. Most Prolog programmers consider each compound as a type and would consider a compound that is not point(_,_) a type_error.

 type_error(+ValidType, +Culprit)
Tell the user that Culprit is not of the expected ValidType. This error is closely related to domain_error/2 because the notion of types is not really set in stone in Prolog. We introduce the difference using a simple example.

Suppose an argument must be a non-negative integer. If the actual argument is not an integer, this is a type_error. If it is a negative integer, it is a domain_error.

Typical borderline cases are predicates accepting a compound term, e.g., point(X,Y). One could argue that the basic type is a compound-term and any other compound term is a domain error. Most Prolog programmers consider each compound as a type and would consider a compound that is not point(_,_) a type_error.